Australia Towers II

The landscape design at Australia Towers stitches the site into its local context by drawing upon the principles of a ‘borrowed landscape’.

The landscape design at Australia Towers stitches the site into its local context by drawing upon the principles of a ‘borrowed landscape’. In essence, it is about borrowing the scenery around us to make our own garden look even more amazing.

The original site; former abattoir stock holding paddocks with fig trees planted in the centre of each paddock provided shelter for stock. The landscape design opened up vistas to allow remnant vegetation and the old figs to be seen from the site. By ‘borrowing’ these views, it connects the new site back into the bigger landscape. Our team specified a similar planting palette to its local area and planted a fig tree in the new site to celebrate its historical heritage.

A small park to the south of Fig Tree Place functions as a shared community space for Australia Towers’ residents. The garden descends down to the southern-most edge of the site.

The podium gardens available to residents of both towers feature:

  • richly layered plantings that create a garden essentially secret from the outside world
  • a central ‘arbour terrace’ featuring an ‘eye’ of slender eucalypts in gravel, offering a window into the world beyond and across to Bicentennial Park
  • a central lawn featuring a jacaranda, flame tree & scented gums gently tilts towards the central terrace.
  • a dense lilly pilly hedge immediately south of the central lawn encloses the space while reducing wind impacts.

The public domain strategy aims to improve pedestrians and cycle connections between Sydney Olympic Park town centre and Bicentennial Park. The existing footpath is integrated with the Australia Towers site to create an environment that is both safely accessible and seamless in transition between private and public land.